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posted by atwilson on Aug 19, 2015

Cynthia, yes that's correct; there is...

posted by cynthia.crawford on Aug 19, 2015

Alex-Sorry- I meant to say sprayed- fiberglass. Thank you for your answer in any case, for both foam and fiberglass. It's the first time I've heard that borates might not discourage rodents. Invasion of rodents is a major problem with our home. No basement and up on concrete piers, made from an old barn frame, so hard to seal out critters. They pose a major human health threat. I understand , from looking as the...

posted by atwilson on Aug 18, 2015

Cynthia, Spider is a spray-fiberglass product, not a spray-foam, but neither material could be considered rodent-proof. In our home, rodent entry at the basement level should be pretty well blocked by Foamglas insulation (which is the most rodent-proof of any insulation material), but rodent entry could occur higher in our house—perhaps through soffit vents or a gap in the metal screening on the rainscreen. So far, no problems.

To your point, I'm not convinced that borates will keep rodents out. Borate has very low mammalian toxicity—which is one reason we have liked it from a...

posted by cynthia.crawford on Aug 18, 2015

Since sprayed foam doesn't require boric acid, how does it prevent rodents from entering a building or burrowing into the fiberglass? They certainly have gotten into our fiberglass batts big time.

posted by jstensland on Jul 15, 2015

Word of caution: some friends had a terrible time using Cali Bamboo interior products. It was difficult to get the company to take any responsibility for their product. Buyer beware!

posted by ccnyIP on May 20, 2015

I Have been in construction for many years and am now finishing my degree in mechanical engineering. I am truly amazed at reviews of many things and this is one. Some people have given poor reviews of AAC do to obviously poor installation and handling. AAC is a building material! If I got cracked improperly cured bricks and then installed them could I blame bricks?

Then someone is crying about how after using AAC they still needed heating and cooling? Not to say anything truly bad but, what makes anyone think that you can put up a single layer of a material and end the world energy...

posted by pmelton on Apr 30, 2015

Here's a quick explanation of what a hygrothermal assessment can tell you about a moisture situation.

posted by pmelton on Apr 29, 2015

John, I'm sorry to hear about your troubles. Based on my conversation with Peter Yost, our resident building scientist, it sounds like you've done a lot of work that was a good idea anyway, even though it doesn't seem to have solved the particular moisture issue of concern. So that's a great start.

There are building science experts who perform hygrothermal analyses of homes. Most of the specialists who work with moisture control are NOT the same specialists who work with mold remediation. This is how you've ended up in a situation where you've remediated mold twice without...

posted by john.c.lowry on Apr 28, 2015

We bought a house in Hot Springs, Arkansas, in 2010 that has had a continuing issue of excessive moisture readings and moldy smells, primarily in a west and south facing corner. The house is on a slab. We first thought pressure washing created the problem, then a poorly fabricated flagstone patio was a suspect. Uncaulked windows were also an item of interest. We have had two sessions of mold remediation, pulling built-ins and drywall, etc. Both times mold was treated and or the drywall/insulation, etc. was removed. We also removed the flagstone, installed a French drain and...

posted by bates.paul on Apr 9, 2015

Hi-

I reviewed your story on "...

posted by atwilson on Aug 19, 2015

Cynthia, yes that's correct; there is...

posted by cynthia.crawford on Aug 19, 2015

Alex-Sorry- I meant to say sprayed- fiberglass. Thank you for your answer in any case, for both foam and fiberglass. It's the first time I've heard that borates might not discourage rodents. Invasion of rodents is a major problem with our home. No basement and up on concrete piers, made from an old barn frame, so hard to seal out critters. They pose a major human health threat. I understand , from looking as the...

posted by atwilson on Aug 18, 2015

Cynthia, Spider is a spray-fiberglass product, not a spray-foam, but neither material could be considered rodent-proof. In our home, rodent entry at the basement level should be pretty well blocked by Foamglas insulation (which is the most rodent-proof of any insulation material), but rodent entry could occur higher in our house—perhaps through soffit vents or a gap in the metal screening on the rainscreen. So far, no problems.

To your point, I'm not convinced that borates will keep rodents out. Borate has very low mammalian toxicity—which is one reason we have liked it from a...

posted by cynthia.crawford on Aug 18, 2015

Since sprayed foam doesn't require boric acid, how does it prevent rodents from entering a building or burrowing into the fiberglass? They certainly have gotten into our fiberglass batts big time.

posted by ccnyIP on May 20, 2015

I Have been in construction for many years and am now finishing my degree in mechanical engineering. I am truly amazed at reviews of many things and this is one. Some people have given poor reviews of AAC do to obviously poor installation and handling. AAC is a building material! If I got cracked improperly cured bricks and then installed them could I blame bricks?

Then someone is crying about how after using AAC they still needed heating and cooling? Not to say anything truly bad but, what makes anyone think that you can put up a single layer of a material and end the world energy...

posted by pmelton on Apr 30, 2015

Here's a quick explanation of what a hygrothermal assessment can tell you about a moisture situation.

posted by pmelton on Apr 29, 2015

John, I'm sorry to hear about your troubles. Based on my conversation with Peter Yost, our resident building scientist, it sounds like you've done a lot of work that was a good idea anyway, even though it doesn't seem to have solved the particular moisture issue of concern. So that's a great start.

There are building science experts who perform hygrothermal analyses of homes. Most of the specialists who work with moisture control are NOT the same specialists who work with mold remediation. This is how you've ended up in a situation where you've remediated mold twice without...

posted by john.c.lowry on Apr 28, 2015

We bought a house in Hot Springs, Arkansas, in 2010 that has had a continuing issue of excessive moisture readings and moldy smells, primarily in a west and south facing corner. The house is on a slab. We first thought pressure washing created the problem, then a poorly fabricated flagstone patio was a suspect. Uncaulked windows were also an item of interest. We have had two sessions of mold remediation, pulling built-ins and drywall, etc. Both times mold was treated and or the drywall/insulation, etc. was removed. We also removed the flagstone, installed a French drain and...

posted by bates.paul on Apr 9, 2015

Hi-

I reviewed your story on "...

posted by granda on Apr 8, 2015

Hi Alex,
I've been following your experience with the Zehnder unit with interest. By the way, my understanding is that Barry Stephens is brother to Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance's Charlie Stephens.

Ten years ago we installed a UltimateAir DX200 ERV in our new home in Richmond, VT. It has worked fairly well, though the three motors all needed replacement at around year 5 and there have been issues with the exchange medium ending up where it shouldn't. Also, because our house is so tight the humidity recovery during the winter ended up being more of a problem than a...

posted by jstensland on Jul 15, 2015

Word of caution: some friends had a terrible time using Cali Bamboo interior products. It was difficult to get the company to take any responsibility for their product. Buyer beware!

Curtainwall and 700 Series Board Insulations
posted by pmelton on Mar 3, 2015

That is good info for our readers, Dagmar. Thanks for posting.

Curtainwall and 700 Series Board Insulations
posted by dagmar.ebaugh on Mar 3, 2015

Hi - You can always find the status of current GREENGUARD Certification in our Sustainable Product Guide at www.ul.com/SPG. The direct link to the search query for Owens Corning GREENGUARD Certified Insulation is http://productguide.ulenvironment.com/SearchResults.aspx?BrandID=367&Cat...

Curtainwall and 700 Series Board Insulations
posted by behrlich on Feb 18, 2015

Melanie, good catch. Looks like this product no longer has Greenguard certification. I've updated the listing.

Curtainwall and 700 Series Board Insulations
posted by behrlich on Feb 18, 2015

Melanie, good catch. Looks like this product no longer has Greenguard certification. I've updated the listing.

Curtainwall and 700 Series Board Insulations
posted by astadtner on Feb 17, 2015

Hello, I am having some difficulty locating documentation on the 700 Series GREENGUARD certification via the Owens Corning website. Is there any documentation to back up their claim? Thanks! Melanie Loftus

Roxul Mineral Wool Insulation Batts
posted by tristan on Jan 2, 2015

Jon, as we wrote in our more detailed EBN review, the binder is formaldehyde. Testing shows that it emits from the product levels less than 0.0135 parts per million (ppm). Average background levels are 0.02 ppm. So in theory someone could react to this, but we are not emphasizing it in our writeup since the data shows it is a very minor point, especially when this insulation is placed...

Roxul Mineral Wool Insulation Batts
posted by jon on Dec 31, 2014

I was surprised that the review of this product didn't mention the urea-extended phenol formaldehyde binder. According to a EBN a Article "Formaldehyde is a known carcinogen, but according to the industry, almost all of the formaldehyde in mineral wool insulation is eliminated in the production process through a chemical reaction and high heat." Roxul claims low emission levels but sensitive individuals could have a reaction and would be cautioned not...

AdvanTech OSB
posted by notes2jill on Sep 24, 2014

Brent thank you!

AdvanTech OSB
posted by behrlich on Sep 24, 2014

Hi Jill,

You raise a good question, but rest assured that Huber is not adding free formaldehyde. I spoke with the company and they are simply accounting for the free formaldehyde that occurs naturally in wood. They should probably make that clearer, though.

Thanks, Brent

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