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Simple Pumps

The Simple Pump Company offers a variety of manual and motorized well-head pumps that can operate either as a primary well pump or alongside an existing pump as a secondary option for power outages… Read more
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  • With energy-consuming equipment, such as water heaters and refrigerators, we have good data on energy consumption and can set clear standards accordingly. In some product categories—clothes washers, for example—Energy Star standards were adopted because those standards provide a high enough threshold to represent just the very top segment of the product market (less than 10%). In other product categories—e.g., refrigerators and dishwashers—we set a higher threshold than ENERGY STAR: for example, exceeding those standards by 10% or 20%. With lighting and lighting control equipment, certain generic products qualify, such as compact fluorescent lamps and occupancy/daylighting controls, while in other categories only a subset of products qualify. In some cases, products that meet the energy efficiency requirements are excluded, because of evidence of poor performance or durability. Microturbines are included here because of the potential for cogeneration (combined heat and power) that they offer.

  • Equipment and products that enable us to use renewable energy instead of fossil fuels and conventional electricity are highly beneficial. Examples include solar thermal systems, solar electric (photovoltaic) systems, and wind turbines. Other power generation equipment, such as fuel cells and some energy storage systems (like batteries) are included here because they help us accommodate varied energy sources so that we may eventually move beyond fossil-fuel dependence.

  • While resilience—the ability to weather natural disasters and maintain livable conditions in the aftermath of disruptive events—is mostly an issue of building design and community preparedness, certain products can help. For example, almost all heating systems require electricity to operate even if their primary fuel is oil, gas, or wood pellets; systems that allow operation even if grid electricity is not available are more resilient in the event of power outages. Rainwater harvesting, water storage, composting toilets, and waterless urinals contribute to resilience not only in drought-prone areas but also during power outages in any home dependent on well water. Solar water heating systems that can operate without utility power, and back-up power systems that are more energy-efficient than standard generators, may have this attribute.

Tristan Roberts
Editorial Director

The Simple Pump Company offers a variety of manual and motorized well-head pumps that can operate either as a primary well pump or alongside an existing pump as a secondary option for power outages. Motorized pumps use 12V or 24V DC current and are designed to be powered by a small solar or wind array. Hand pumps are available, and can be switched easily with motorized pumps. Simple pumps can draw from as deep as 350 feet.

Pumps that can provide clean, potable water, even during power outages or other service interruptions, help make homes and communities more resilient, and less reliant on emergency supplies that may involve fuel-powered generators or truck delivery.

GreenSpec lists modern, manually operated pumps that can be installed on standard shallow and deep wells. Some models may be able to be easily switched to solar-powered operation.

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